Twomblies 8

Trieste, February 2020

“I don’t follow too much what people say. I live in Gaeta or ­Lexington, Virginia, and I just have all the time to myself. I had years and years when no one could care less, so I was very well ­protected. I had my freedom and that was nice.”
(Cy Twombly, 2008)

Twomblies 7

Trieste, February 2020

“Graffiti is linear and it’s done with a pencil, and it’s like writing on walls. But [in my paintings] it’s more lyrical. In those beautiful early paintings like Academy, it’s graffiti but it’s something else, too. I don’t know how people ­react, but the feeling is more complicated, more elaborate. Graffiti is usually a protest – ink on walls – or has a reason for ­being naughty or aggressive.”
(Cy Twombly, 2008, from an Interview with Nicholas Serota, The Guardian)

Twomblies 18

Trieste, February 2020

“He avoided publicity throughout his life and mostly ignored his critics, who questioned constantly whether his work deserved a place at the forefront of 20th century abstraction, though he lived long enough to see it arrive there. It didn’t help that his paintings, because of their surface complexity and whirlwinds of tiny detail — scratches, erasures, drips, penciled fragments of Italian and classical verse amid scrawled phalluses and buttocks — lost much of their power in reproduction.”
Randy Kennedy, New York Times, July 2011, on Cy Twombly